Get a Roku for the best HD media experience on your TV without all the clutter!

The Roku is a great way to catch all your favorite web-based programming, including Category5 Technology TV, Netflix, and so much more!

Buy your device from here to support Category5 Technology TV:

Model Description Buy Now
Roku Streaming Stick  

The Roku Streaming Stick brings you a solution that is entirely hidden away, plugged directly into your TV’s HDMI port. It will only work with HDTV’s for this reason, and is well suited for situations where the TV is mounted on a wall, where you don’t want to see any wires. The Roku Streaming Stick supports the same great channel lineup as the other models. This model is only recommended if you need that discreetness. The other units are more powerful. Buy
Roku 1  

The Roku 1 is the entry level unit, giving you full access to all the channels available in the Roku Channel Store. It will work with old-style televisions (composite—not component) as well as your HDTV over HDMI. It has the standard Roku remote which does not include a headphone jack. Buy
Roku 2  

The Roku 2 is very similar to the Roku 1, but it has dual-band WiFi (better/faster WiFi) and a high-quality headphone jack built into the wireless remote. You can listen to your shows or music with the privacy—and quality—of a set of headphones. Works with the included earbuds, or your favorite set of headphones with a 1/8″ plug (standard). The Roku 2 will also work on old TVs as well as HDTVs, as it offers both HDMI and composite outputs. Buy
Roku 3  

The Roku 3 is the fastest, most feature rich version of the Roku. It will only work on HDTVs (720p or 1080p). Like the Roku 2, this model has dual-band WiFi, a headphone jack in the remote, but also adds gaming functionality, an ethernet port (hard wire your Internet connection rather than using WiFi). There is also a USB port and MicroSD port, allowing you to load your own videos or pictures onto flash media and load them on your TV. This Roku is the all-round HD entertainment device: television shows, movies, games, and even home movies. Because it is so much faster than the other models, the Roku 3 also has a more robust featureset for channels such as Netflix. While Netflix will work on all the devices, the Roku 3 is the only one which supports the “new Netflix”, with more advanced features such as viewer profiles. My Roku 2 for example, loads the default profile for Netflix and works great, but has no option to switch to the kids’ profile. The Roku 3 has that capability. Roku 3 will not work on old TVs as it only features an HDMI output. Buy

Feed servers rolled over, affecting Miro Internet TV, RSS feeds, and direct downloads.

As you know, I’ve worked hard to bring you the new transcoders the past while.

This meant introducing a whole new distribution model, with all new servers and a redeveloped distribution infrastructure for Category5 TV (yes, we outgrew our previous solutions).

We have a number of main distribution nodes, but there are three primary content delivery networks.  We’ll call them CDN 1, CDN 2, and CDN 3.

During the initial stages of the transition, we placed our RSS feeds, Miro Internet TV and other “downloaders” such as the direct download links on CDN 1.  It is our slowest, least reliable CDN, but it is also the cheapest for us to operate.

CDN 2 was not in use yet, and CDN 3 is our fastest, most reliable and most expensive system.  CDN 3 was implemented as our on-demand distribution node.  This means if you watched the show via our web site or a player embed, you were watching it through CDN 3.

Miro Internet TV in particular was experiencing some speed issues pulling form CDN 1, and the past two weeks one of our syndicate partners was also having trouble pulling the HD file down from the CDN 1 direct download links as provided by our weekly email.

So, I have now replicated everything onto CDN 2, which is much faster and more reliable than CDN 1, but not nearly as expensive as CDN 3 to operate.

I have moved all RSS feeds, Miro Internet TV feeds and direct download links onto CDN 2 and now CDN 1 becomes simply a redundant option for us to use should either of the other CDN’s become unavailable.

All this to say, you should now notice that your downloads are faster, and that you don’t experience timeouts when downloading the larger HD files from our services.

Thanks for your patience as we worked out the kinks.

To subscribe, visit http://cat5.tv/rss

Cheers,
Robbie

Farewell, Space Fish

August 16, 2011 - October 4, 2013

Space Fish: August 16, 2011 – October 4, 2013

Having made his first international appearance during Episode 204 of Category5 TV Tuesday August 16, 2011, our studio mascot Space Fish, Major Tom passed on this day, Friday October 4, 2013.  He spent 2 years, 1 month, 19 days with us in-studio.

Major Tom will always be remembered fondly for his colorful appearance. He also had a distinct talent for stinking up the studio despite our futile efforts to keep his habitat clean.

Major Tom’s final appearance on the live broadcast took place during Episode 283, Tuesday February 19, 2013.

Make Your Site Faster – Cloudflare’s CDNJS vs. Google Hosted Libraries – SHOCKING Results

I have used Google Hosted Libraries for as long as I can remember, and it’s what we use on Category5.TV to accelerate the javascript end of our site.  For all the javascript and CSS (plus images and so-on) we use that aren’t available through Google’s hosted solution, I use Amazon S3 and distribute it through Cloudflare to make it load quickly for our viewers.

I’ve been fast falling in love with Cloudflare’s CDNJS.

CDNJS boasts that it is in fact much faster than Google Hosted Libraries.

Neah… that can’t be true!  Google’s the “big dog”… Cloudflare is still relatively new.

RELATED VIDEO

So I took a look.  The first thing that shocked me was the absolute magnitude of how many javascript tools are available through CDNJS.  Gone is the need to (for example) load jQuery from Google Hosted Libraries but then have to download and deploy a copy of Fancybox 2 locally or on your own CDN.  CDNJS seems to have it all.  Or at least a great selection, plus the ability to add a library yourself via GitHub.

Sorry, what?  Yeah, baby.

So I thought, let’s run the world’s simplest test: how fast does wget receive the jQuery library on Linux?  It may not be a realistic benchmark in all cases, but it gives us a bit of a look at how quickly each service delivers the js.

Here are those simple (but amazing) results from my location in Ontario, Canada:

Google Hosted Libaries
[email protected]:/tmp$ wget http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js
–2013-03-22 13:50:47–  http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js
Resolving ajax.googleapis.com… 74.125.133.95, 2607:f8b0:4001:c02::5f
Connecting to ajax.googleapis.com|74.125.133.95|:80… connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 200 OK
Length: unspecified [text/javascript]
Saving to: jquery.min.js.1' [ <=> ] 92,629      --.-K/s   in 0.1s

2013-03-22 13:50:47 (798 KB/s) - jquery.min.js.1′ saved [92629]

CDNJS
[email protected]:/tmp$ wget http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js
–2013-03-22 13:49:57–  http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js
Resolving cdnjs.cloudflare.com… 141.101.123.8, 190.93.243.8, 190.93.242.8, …
Connecting to cdnjs.cloudflare.com|141.101.123.8|:80… connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 200 OK
Length: unspecified [application/x-javascript]
Saving to: jquery.min.js' [ <=> ]  92,629      --.-K/s   in 0.04s

2013-03-22 13:49:58 (2.21 MB/s) - jquery.min.js’ saved [92629]

Note the filesize (92,629) is exactly the same; we’re dealing with the same version of jQuery here–identical files.  Also note that I’ve used a non-secure (http) connection for each.  The difference in speed is incredible.

Now, for a basic site, the fraction-of-a-second difference may not matter to you.  But for a big site like mine, this kind of difference could mean a full second off the load time–possibly more!  That’s unheard of for a simple copy-and-paste change in code.

Time to update Category5.TV.  What about your site?  Please comment below.

Update:  Garbee made a great point in our IRC room:  You’re only seeing results from my location.  Fair enough.  We want to make sure this isn’t just me that is experiencing such a massive difference.  Therefore, please run this exact test yourself, and post your results below in a comment.  I’m in Ontario, Canada.  Where are you?  Thanks!

First Day Results Extracted from Reader Comments:

  • Me:
    Ontario Canada – Google @ 798 KB/s, CDNJS @ 2.21 MB/s, CDNJS is 2.77x the speed of Google.
    Brea California – Google @ 2.27 MB/s, CDNJS @ 14.5 MB/s, CDNJS is 6.39x the speed of Google.
  • Garbee:
    Virginia USA – Google @ 429 KB/s, CDNJS @ 496 KB/s, CDNJS is 1.16x the speed of Google.
    New Jersey USA – Google @ 104 KB/s, CDNJS @ 2.60 MB/s, CDNJS is 25x the speed of Google.
  • Chris Neves:
    Montana USA – Google @ 123 KB/s, CDNJS @ 300 KB/s, CDNJS is 2.44x the speed of Google.
  • Alan Pope:
    Farnborough UK – Google @ 1.26 MB/s, CDNJS @ 1.16 MB/s, Google is 1.08x the speed of CDNJS.
    London England – Google @ 6.79 MB/s, CDNJS @ 4.72 MB/s, Google is 1.44x the speed of CDNJS.
  • steve5:
    Leeds UK – Google @ 153 KB/s, CDNJS @ 178 KB/s, CDNJS is 1.16x the speed of Google.
  • Bryce:
    Seattle Washington – Google @ 1.83 MB/s, CDNJS @ 659 KB/s, Google is 2.78x the speed of CDNJS.
  • Calvin:
    Massachusetts USA
    Test 1: Unsecure Connection
    – Google @ 810 KB/s, CDNJS @ 876 KB/s, CDNJS is 1.08x the speed of Google.
    Test 2: Secure Connection – Google @ 721 KB/s, CDNJS @ 1.08 MB/s, CDNJS is 1.5x the speed of Google.

CDNJS

SUPERAntiSpyware falsely detecting Trojan.Agent/Gen-Kryptik

Many SUPERAntiSpyware users are experiencing an annoying (and possibly costly) problem this morning.  Apparently their system became infected with hundreds of copies of Trojan.Agent/Gen-Kryptik over the weekend.

After looking in-depth at a number of client systems, it would appear the alerts are false-positives.
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