Why support may ask for your backup.nems file, and why you should never share it with others

During support sessions I often request either SSH access or a copy of the user’s backup.nems file. SSH access, it should be obvious, should not be shared with just anyone. Also, you should never, ever, ever, open SSH to the world on your NEMS server if you have not yet initialized it. This is because there are botnets that look for Raspberry Pi computers which use the default “raspberry” password, and then compromize them. Continue reading

Sound Of Walking Away – Illenium ft. Kerli

I love how Kerli just rips through this track. She has such a wicked tone. That high vocal before the beat drops? YES! And Illenium does it again. SFW.

NEMS 1.2.1 Technical Information

The following is the technical information outline of NEMS (Nagios Enterprise Monitoring Server). Continue reading

Add A Drive to Linux and Encrypt It

Do you use an external hard drive, USB Flash drive or other removable media for your personal or company backups? Let’s encrypt it! Continue reading

I hosted an episode of The Pixel Shadow!

I’m so not a gamer, but over the weekend I got the fun chance to record an episode of The Pixel Shadow with me as host. Continue reading

Setting up NRPE on Windows for NEMS

Please Note: As of NEMS 1.2 NSClient++ is optional for monitoring of Windows computers (thanks to the addition of WMIC). If you’d like to use it, please follow the directions below.

  1. Grab the latest Windows client at https://www.nsclient.org/download/
  2. Install the client with the following settings:
    • Select to install the “Generic mode” NSClient++.
    • Choose “Complete installation” and if asked, choose to save config to ini file.
    • Under “Allowed Hosts” it should read 127.0.0.1,NEMSIP (where NEMSIP is the IP address of your NEMS server)
    • Clear the Password field for ease of deployment. NEMS sample scripts are setup to use NRPE without a password because I’m making the assumption that this is being deployed in a trusted LAN. If you do not blank the password here, you will have to edit all the scripts before NEMS will be able to communicate with this computer.
    • Enable all modules and change the NRPE mode to Legacy. NEMS uses Nagios 3.5.1 at present, and I suppose that’s technically “Legacy”. 🙂
    • Screen should look a little something like this:
      nsclient-setup
  3. Add your Windows host to NEMS. If you are using NEMS 1.1+ you can use the template “ourwinserver” in nconf. Just change the hostname and the IP address.

Please note: If you have a software firewall running on your Windows machine, setup an exception for your NEMS server IP to gain access through ports 5666 and 12489.

Category5 TV Network license changed.

For the past 9 years, all Category5 TV Network programming has been licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada.

In an effort to ensure both our own protection from the commercial reuse of our freely available content as well as to protect our viewers from companies adding protection such as DRM to our content, we are now moving all Category5 TV Network programming, retroactively, to the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0).

Effective immediately under our new license, any commercial reuse of our material (eg., broadcasting on a commercial television channel, using our videos to generate revenue online, etc) must be approved in writing by myself.

Category5 TV remains entirely free for its viewers, no matter where they live in this big ol’ world of ours.

Enjoy the shows!

Robbie

Backup a Linux machine with LVM Snapshots and rdiff-backup

Here is the completed script I wrote on Episode 461. Make sure you check out the full episode for details on how to make this work for you.

And of course, here is the episode:

Drone Zone Skill Rating

With The Drone Zone about to take flight, I wanted a way to rate the skill level required (or rather, recommended) for each drone we review. The purpose is so viewers can gauge during a review, from the DZSR (Drone Zone Skill Rating) which drone(s) they should be looking at first.

I’m open to suggestions, so please post your comments and this will become a bit of a living list, updated as needed. I will also maintain a static copy on The Drone Zone web site.


DZSR Level A
This drone is perfect for a beginner pilot. It’s easy to learn, has a price point that won’t hurt your wallet too badly if you crash it, and is a good drone to start with. As you take on drone flight, it’s best to start at DZSR Level A so you can learn the controls, practice, and get ready for the next level.
Mature pilots will also enjoy drones in this level as they’re nice to be able to carry around so you can fly wherever you are just for fun, without much consideration, packing or planning.
Typical drones in this level: Nano quads.

DZSR Level B
If you’ve mastered drones at DZSR Level A, you’re ready to move on to DZSR Level B.
Typical drones in this level: Toy camera quads, Entry level FPV.

DZSR Level C
If you’ve mastered drones at DZSR Levels A and B, you’re ready to move on to DZSR Level C.
Typical Drones in this level: Video drones, drones with GPS, Racing drones.

DZSR Level D
If you’ve mastered drones at DZSR Levels A, B and C, you’re ready to move on to DZSR Level D.
Typical Drones in this level: High-end/custom quads/hexacopters, DIY quadcopters.

Plex Media Server on a Raspberry Pi 3

I wanted to document the instructions shared on Episode 459 to supplement the episode.

On the show, Jeff and I demonstrated how to turn a Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian Jessie into a Plex Media Server, giving you the chance to stream your entire video and music library to all your devices.

I won’t get into the full details here, since this is only a supplement to give you some copy-and-paste instructions, but I’d encourage you to watch the video.

What You Need

  1. A Raspberry Pi 3 Micro Computer. Please consider purchasing it through our store to support what we do: https://cat5.tv/pi
  2. Raspbian Jessie – A free download from raspberrypi.org
  3. Obvious stuff like a good MicroSD card, Ethernet cable (preferred as opposed to wifi), keyboard and mouse… etc.

How to Do The Do

  1. In terminal, upgrade your distro to the latest and greatest.
  2. Reboot the Pi.
  3. Add the ability for apt to use https repositories.
  4. Add the Plex Media Server repository provided by Universität Leipzig.

    Add this line:
  5. Add the GPG key for the repository.
    This is the “easy” method (which didn’t work for us because my keyboard was in some weird mode with no pipe character):

    Alternate method (which I had to use on the show since I didn’t have a pipe character… I’ve cleaned it up a bit since the live show so it is cleaner since it was an unexpected twist and I kinda made it seem more confusing than it should):
  6. Update apt.
  7. Install Plex Media Server.
  8. Create the default config file so Plex knows what user to operate under.

    (Thanks to Steve for submitting this additional step)
  9. Reboot one final time.

And there you have it! All the commands we used to get Plex Media Server installed on a Raspberry Pi 3 in a nice clean blog post  🙂

From there, we plugged in the USB flash drive (don’t do it! Use a proper external hard drive–this was only a demonstration) and after it mounted we used the following command to see its /dev assignment:

Since our drive was /dev/sda1, and of the filesystem type “fat32” this is what I did to make it work as the media library for Plex Media Server:

and add the following line:

I then created the mountpoint:

and made it so it can only be written to if mounted:

and finally, mounted the drive:

From there, I could easily add folders on my external drive to Plex using the web interface, which you’ll find on Port 32400 in the /web subfolder on your Pi.

To get my IP address, I brought up the terminal on the Pi and typed:

That showed the IP address of my Pi under “Ethernet”… 192.168.0.105

So to open Plex in my browser, from my computer I entered:

The IP address will most likely be different for yours, and you might even want to set it up as a static IP. Easiest way to do that would be to use your router’s DHCP reservations to hard-set the Pi to something outside your DHCP pool. For me, that’d be 192.168.0.5 or something like that, since the pool seemingly starts at 100.

Good luck, and if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below. Don’t forget, if this has helped you out, or if you just love supporting nice guys who wanna keep giving knowledge for free, please head over to our Patreon page, or throw a bit in the tip jar. Thanks!